As the weather warms up more people will be heading outdoors to enjoy a hike. Of course, many of the areas perfect for hiking are also home to rattlesnakes.

Staying on marked trails when hiking is one of the biggest things you can do to stay safe. You should also be aware of your surroundings especially in areas where you're likely to encounter a snake.

Anytime you see a snake in your path, slowly back away from it. Give the snake an easy escape route and wait for it to pass by the trail and give it a few minutes.

"They'll start coming out and basking around 65 degrees and then a lot of people think rattlesnakes like it really hot but as soon as it hits 75, 80 degrees you're going to find them in shade. They won't be out and about," said Cameron Young with the Center for Snake Conservation.

The only venomous snake in our area is the rattlesnake Young said. The rattle is a warning to stay away. It does not mean that the snake is going strike, according to Young.

Most people get struck by rattlesnakes when they try to pick them up with a stick, Colorado Parks and Wildlife told 9NEWS last summer.

If you or someone else gets bitten by a rattlesnake seek medical attention immediately. Don't try to suck the venom out.

"Cell phone and car keys are the best first aid kit," Young said. "Get yourself to where they can come get you or get yourself to the hospital."